Dec 14, 2018  
2018-2019 APU Catalog 
    
2018-2019 APU Catalog

Degree Programs - Overview & Curricular Framework


  • Graduate Degree Programs
  • Undergraduate Degree Programs in the Arts & Sciences
  • Undergraduate Degree Programs in Professional Studies
  • Early Honors Program
  • Active Learning & APU
  • Core Competency Curriculum & APU
  • Defining Core Competencies
  • Overview of Competency Attainment
  • Core Competencies & Foundational Studies
  • Associate-Level Degrees - Overview
  • Bachelor-Level Degrees - Overview

Graduate Degree Programs

Alaska Pacific University offers graduate programs to grow professional capacity in Alaska and address Alaska-relevant professional needs.  Graduate programs span critical and creative fields of study:  Master of Arts Program (M.A), Business (M.B.A., E.M.B.A’s, and graduate certificates), Counseling Psychology (M.S. and Psy.D.), Education (K-8 teacher preparation graduate certificate), Environmental Science (M.S), and Outdoor and Environmental Education (M.S.).  Each graduate program provides for advanced study appropriate to the field and professional standards. 

Undergraduate Degree Programs in the Arts & Sciences

Undergraduate degree programs in the Arts and Sciences prepare students for the opportunities and challenges of the 21st century, locally and globally.  At the core of APU’s liberal arts mission, full-time students pursue distinctive bachelor-level programs in Counseling Psychology (B.A.), Creative & Professional Writing (B.A.), Liberal Studies (B.A.), Marine & Environmental Sciences (B.S.), Outdoor Studies (B.A.), and Sustainability Studies (B.A.).  With opportunities for travel courses, educational exchanges, internships, and unique concentrations, these programs provide students with knowledge, skills, and experience for entre into meaningful careers or graduate study.

Courses are offered in a variety of modes, with the general expectation that each semester students take a single, intensive 4-week ‘block’ course, followed by an 11-week ‘session’ where multiple courses are taken.  In the ‘block and session’ format, students are more focused on fewer subjects at one time – providing more opportunity for active learning and deep understanding.

Degree programs feature:  the first-year experiences which connect students to study in Alaska, ethical concerns, and critical thinking skills;  sophomore seminars focusing on professional considerations in the chosen fields of study; junior practicum and internships for career-readiness and research applications; and culminating senior projects.

Undergraduate Degree Programs in Professional Studies

Professional Studies programs at the undergraduate level advance leadership to meet pressing professional needs particularly for Alaska.  APU’s professional programs are designed specifically for students who are working while going to school and want to begin or complete a degree in the fields of Alaska Native Governance (B.A.), Business Administration (undergraduate certificate and A.A.), Business Administration & Management (B.A.), Community Health (undergraduate certificate and A.A.S.), and Nursing (B.S.N).  The curriculum is structured to be manageable for those who are employed part-time or full-time and designed with the expectation that work experience will inform coursework and vice versa.  Evening, eLearning, and module-format courses improve educational access and professional development for students who prefer or are otherwise unable to take advantage of traditional campus-based courses.  Students in professional programs, can still avail themselves of any courses offered at APU, not just evening and online sections.

The professional degree programs focus intently on how theories and course content are relevant to Alaska and Alaska Native communities, agencies, businesses, institutions, organizations, and initiatives.  Methods of instruction reflect APU’s active learning philosophy. Such learning experiences include engaging in independent research, participating in peer-group learning, managing and executing projects, and writing and reflection.

Early Honors Program

Alaska Pacific University offers the Early Honors Program for qualified high school seniors. Early Honors students take a full year of classes at APU as non-degree seeking students, fulfilling remaining high school graduation requirements while also earning transferable college credit. Students gain an appreciation of the arts and sciences, and build and refine their analytical and expressive reasoning powers.

During the first semester, Early Honors students enroll in a common university-level curriculum designed to satisfy requirements of the Anchorage and Mat-Su School Districts. The Fall Block starts off with the required course, CRIT 13300 Critical Thinking. During Fall Session, students enroll in designated sections of WRIT 10100 Argumentation, the second required course of the progam. As well, students are encouraged to pursue math and science coursework in the Fall Session in order to advance their studies in these crucial areas.  Placement in math courses depends on prior coursework in high school, and there are choices among the science offerings, including biology, chemistry, physics, and geology.

In the second semester, Early Honors students elect to participate in the Literature and Culture Travel Course for the January Block (see HUM 20400 Travel: Literature and Culture) or another course from offerings in communications, psychology, outdoor studies, or the humanities. During the Spring Session, students have the opportunity to select courses relevant to their personal and academic interests.

Because APU does not grant high school diplomas, students remain enrolled in their home high schools, and work with their high school registrar and guidance counselor to graduate from those schools. The Early Honors advisors assist in this process to ensure that high school graduation requirements are met.

Active Learning

APU’s curriculum is distinguished by the university’s mission to provide world class, hands-on, culturally relevant educational experiences, grounded in active learning. Active learning refers to the process of deep understanding that comes from interactive and reflective education rather than rote memorization and information recall.

Active learning may take place through field study, practical and hands-on exercises, individual and group projects, writing and discussion, or peer-review and self-assessment.  Most importantly, active learning develops within learners the ability to proactively apply and further their understandings of content gained in class beyond the course itself.

There is a difference between ‘active’ and ‘active learning.’ Active may mean you are physically moving.  Active learning means you are reading, writing, discussing, describing, interacting, listening, and most importantly, reflecting on the issues at hand. The ‘active’ aspect of this process refers to the ways in which students move ideas from their studies in to the world - applying knowledge and theory beyond the classroom.  Active learning places the learner in charge of his/her own learning, making the process deeply significant and relevant.

Active learning involves problem solving, critical thinking, and evaluation of how you know what you know.  Irrespective of how APU courses are delivered, active learning frames APU curriculum, with attention to skillful and creative strategies for issue appraisal and problem-solving that can be taken forward and applied in real-world contexts.

Undergraduate Core Competency Curriculum

APU undergradute degree programs instill lifelong love of learning, contribute to personal and professional well-being, and lead to critical and creative care of our world. APU graduates demonstrate competencies crucial for meaningful placement and professional advancement.

‘Competency’ refers to an acquired knowledge, ability, or skill that facilitates achievement or accomplishment.  ‘Core Competency Curriculum’ refers to educational programs designed intentionally to develop and assess particular competencies, from beginning through successively higher levels of achievement.

APU embraces this conceptual framework, with identification of five Core Competencies that are developed through all undergraduate programs.  These priorities correspond to recommendations from the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) and the National Leadership Council for Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP).   APU programs foster high-level intellectual and practical skills, wide-ranging knowledge of science, cultures, and society, and an active commitment to personal and social responsibility.

Intellectual and Practical Skills are developed extensively across the curriculum, in the context of progressively more challenging problems, projects, and standards for performance through the Core Competencies of:
         1.  Effective Communication
         2.  Critical Thinking
Knowledge of Human Culture and our World are given focus by engagement with big  questions, both contemporary and enduring through the Core Competencies of:
         3.  Cultural & Historical Perspective
         4.  Scientific Inquiry
Personal and Social Responsibility are anchored through active involvement with real-world challenges, local and global, through the Core Competency of:
         5.  Ethical Engagement

Focused on the development of five Core Competencies, the undergraduate programs prioritize active, integrative, and applied learning.

  • Active learning is experienced through student-centered approaches that prioritize reflective processing of information, skills of project management, and shared responsibility for the learning outcomes.
  • Integration is marked by assessed accomplishments across Foundational and Major Studies.
  • Application of knowledge, skills, and responsibilities is practiced through increasingly complex problems, and realized in real-world experience and demonstration projects.

Each undergraduate degree program is comprised of the following pathway to competency attainment:

  • Foundational Studies  – introducing Core Competencies and developing aptitude through Active Learning methodologies
  • Major Studies  – further developing Core Competencies through the integration of specialized knowledge and skills, with attention to application of knowledge in real-world contexts, and at the bachelor’s level culminating in senior projects which realize Core Competencies and demonstrate professionalism
  • Self-Determined Studies  – providing for self-direction in educational opportunities

Defining the Core Competencies

1.  Effective Communication
Effective communication involves writing, presentation of ideas in public forums, sharing of information through networks, systems, and organizations, and has as its goal to affect the knowledge or behavior of others. Effective communication requires clarity of one’s own expression through various formats and media, with appreciation for meaning, tone, style, nuance, and content of others’ expression.   Effective communication is essential to success in all of life, from education and employment to parenting and relationships.  Effective communicators construct clear and persuasive presentations of ideas and concerns, elicit and share information in ethical ways, and foster collaborative and civil discourse.

  • Foundational Competency - Students demonstrate skills of written communication, public presentation, and media literacy with the ability to argue particular positions and situate information for inquiry purposes in forms and formats appropriate to different research contexts.
  • Integrated Competency - Students advance competency focusing on technical writing skills in the area of specialization and demonstrating the ability to develop content for disciplinary or professional contexts.
  • Realized Competency - Graduates demonstrate the ability to get one’s point across in writing, presentations, and organizations in order to share information, teach others, and foster collaboration.

2.  Critical Thinking
Critical thinking involves thinking about thinking.  It is the skill of recognizing problems and raising vital questions, identifying appropriate computational approaches to frame problems and offer solutions, gathering pertinent information, and analyzing unstated assumptions and values within that information. Critical thinking requires diligence in critiquing one’s own fundamental assumptions as well as respectfully inquiring into the assumptions of others.  Critical thinking, effectively practiced, appraises evidence in order to reach reasoned conclusions and solutions that make a difference.

  • Foundational Competency - Students demonstrate the ability to think within alternative systems of thought and diverse methods of reasoning, recognizing and assessing their assumptions, implications, and practical consequences.
  • Integrated Competency - Students advance competency focusing on quantitative reasoning related to the area of specialization and information literacy to analyze and evaluate sources and truth claims.
  • Realized Competency - Graduates demonstrate the ability to compute, analyze, make sense of information or data, and reach reasoned conclusions cognizant of possible bias or fallacies.

3.  Cultural & Historical Perspective
Cultural and historical perspective involves analysis, appreciative and critical, of how humans have documented, theorized, represented, and imagined existence.  Perspective requires the capacity to consider ideas and issues in relation to larger contexts so as to demonstrate accurate and fair understanding of situations.  Cultural and historical perspective requires the ability to interpret human expression in our own time and through the centuries, reflect on intellectual traditions and creative endeavors, and develop understanding of one’s own and others’ worldviews.  Effectively demonstrated, cultural and historical perspective engages enduring questions of life, religion, consciousness, and creativity with contemporary attention to individual, community, and cultural values.

  • Foundational Competency - Students demonstrate ability to interpret and compare intellectual traditions, creative endeavors, and cultural and spiritual worldviews.
  • Integrated Competency - Students advance competency focusing on local and global perspectives of particular import to the area of specialization.
  • Realized Competency - Graduates demonstrate the ability to effectively consider tradition and heritage in relation to decision-making in a world shaped by diverse cultures and abiding histories.

4.  Scientific Inquiry
Scientific inquiry involves critical observation and documentation of the natural and social environments within which we live.  Related to the biological/physical sciences, inquiry requires the development of knowledge to collect and interpret data from the natural world, investigate fundamental aspects of that data, and contextualize findings.  Related to the social/behavioral sciences, inquiry requires effective evaluation and contextualization of human social behavior at the individual and societal levels.  Developed through appropriate research methods and applications, informed inquiry  in all fields results in observations that are gleaned, analyzed, utilized, and disseminated for further understanding of the human condition and our world.

  • Foundational Competency - Students demonstrate ability to observe, document, and interpret data, and further to report on findings.  Students develop inquiry skills and explore conceptual frameworks in the natural and social/behavioral sciences.
  • Integrated Competency - Students advance competency focusing on research methods and applications appropriate to area of specialization.
  • Realized Competency - Graduates demonstrate the ability to reach verifiable conclusions based on documented observations, findings, and recognized methods in order to know how things work in our world.

5.  Ethical Engagement
Ethical engagement involves the way in which we make choices between competing moral principles, determine who or what is good, and question how we live a good life. Ethical engagement requires examination of rights, obligations, benefits, and fairness.  Ethical engagement requires consideration of how moral standards are reasoned, and how such standards espouse virtuous action as well as obligations to refrain from bad actions. On a personal level, ethical engagement requires the examination of one’s own standards to develop self-direction and responsibility for individual decisions and actions. On a societal level, ethical engagement develops the capability to face challenging dilemmas through principled guidelines.  Further, with attention to local and global sustainability, ethical engagement develops the capacity for creative and critical care of our world.

  • Foundational Competency - Students demonstrate the ability to reason through questions of right and wrong, good and bad, and rights and responsibilities.   Students develop personal responsibility with attention to self-direction and individual decision-making.  Students develop social responsibility with attention to the contested and enduring question of what is good for individuals and society.
  • Integrated Competency - Students advance competency focusing on ethics in the context of specific disciplines, organizations, or professions.  Students also explore the ethical dilemma of sustainability in the 21st century, with its conjoined and competing interests in doing well ethically for people, environmentally for the planet, and economically for profit.
  • Realized Competency - Graduates demonstrate ability to raise needed questions and apply ethical and effective problem-framing and problem-solving to make things better.

Overview of Competency Attainment

Competency attainment for Associate-level degrees is expected to meet Foundational-to-Integrated learning outcomes;  competency attainment for Bachelor-level degrees is expected to meet Realized learning outcomes.

CORE COMPETENCY
FOUNDATIONAL –

Introductory focus of Core Competencies in Foundational Studies

INTEGRATED –

Developing focus of Core Competencies within Major Studies

REALIZED –

Outcomes evidenced by the Senior Project

→ Intellectual and Practical Skills developed extensively across the curriculum, in the context of progressively more challenging problems, projects, and standards for performance

 

1. Effective Communication

 

EC Written Communication

EC Presentation & Media Literacy

 

Technical Writing

Content Development for Specialization 

 

Demonstrating ability to get one’s point across in writing, presentations, and organizations in order to share information and foster collaboration

 

 2. Critical Thinking

 

CT Critical Thinking

 CT Computation

 

Information Literacy

Quantitative Reasoning 

Demonstrating ability to compute, analyze, make sense of information or data, and reach reasoned conclusions cognizant of possible bias, perspective and fallacies

Knowledge of Human Culture and our World focused by engagement with big questions, both contemporary and enduring

 

3. Cultural & Historical Perspective

CH Intellectual Traditions

CH Creative Endeavors

CH Intercultural & Spiritual Understandings

 

Alaskan / Arctic /Local Perspective 

Global Perspective 

Demonstrating ability to effectively consider tradition and heritage in relation to decision-making in a world shaped by diverse cultures and abiding histories

 

4. Scientific Inquiry

   

SI Biological/Physical Scientific Inquiry

SI Social/Behavioral Scientific Inquiry

Application in Specialization

Research Methods in Specialization

Demonstrating ability to reach verifiable conclusions based on documented observations and recognized methods in order to know how things work in our world

Personal and Social Responsibility anchored through active involvement with real-world challenges, local and global 

 

5. Ethical Engagement

 

EE Social Responsibility

EE Personal Responsibility

 

Professional Ethics 

 Sustainability

Demonstrating ability to raise needed questions, frame problems effectively, and apply ethical problem-solving to make things better

Core Competency & Foundational Studies

Foundational Studies are a group of courses that introduce the Core Competencies and are required of all APU undergraduates.  Students continue to develop Core Competencies beyond the Foundational Studies in Major requirements.

Foundational Studies comprise 32-40 credits for Bachelor-level degrees, and 24-28 credits for Associate-level degrees, developing foundational learning outcomes essential to the Core Competencies.

EC Written Communication (4)
Completion of (or placement beyond) WRIT 10100 (Associate), WRIT 20100 (Bachelor)
• Develop soundly-reasoned and well-supported arguments
• Retrieve information and synthesize it for research purposes
• Utilize ethical documentation and citation conventions
• Adapt written communication and implement stylistic conventions appropriate for particular audience, discipline, or professional context

EC Presentation & Media Literacy (3-4)
Completion of 10000-20000 level COMM course or CH 10300
• Develop and practice presentational skills appropriate for various contexts and purposes, informational, organizational, and interpersonal
• Critique communication dynamics that are structured through 21st century, networked technologies
• Assess and improve individual communication skills

CT Critical Thinking (3-4)
Completion of 10000-20000 level CRIT course
• Compare ideological, polarized, or alternative systems of thought, assessing any uncritical dogmas or over-simplified tenets
• Examine methods of reasoning, testing them for relevant criteria, fallacies, and standards in relation to problems or questions
• Apply methods of reasoning within disciplinary, professional, and organizational contexts, and analyze embedded perspectives or biases of the contexts themselves

CT Computation (3-4)
Completion of (or placement beyond) MT 10100 or BAM 10500
• Apply mathematic knowledge and logic to solve problems
• Utilize appropriate computational approaches to quantify data and information

CH Intellectual Traditions *** (4)
Completion of 10000-20000 level PH or HI course, or LS 20100
• Examine critically and appreciatively discourse from philosophical and historical traditions
• Develop reflective and informed responses to intellectual traditions noting the role of such traditions in shaping collective consciousness

CH Creative Endeavors *** (4)
Completion of 10000-20000 level HUM course, or LS 20200
• Examine critically and appreciatively human expression through literature, arts, and other creative works
• Develop reflective and informed responses to creative endeavors noting the role of creativity and creative works in society

CH Intercultural & Spiritual Understandings *** (3-4)
Completion of 10000-20000 level CS or RS course or OS 21400 offering
• Examine comparatively expressions of religious , spiritual, and cultural worldviews, with attention to heritage, values, and identity formation
• Develop reflective and informed responses to spiritual and cultural traditions, honoring diversity of worldviews

SI Biological/Physical Scientific Inquiry^^ (4)
Completion of course focused on the natural sciences with applied learning lab, from:
SC 10000, 11000, 12000, 12500, 14000, 15000, 15500, 16100, 16200, 17000, 17100, 17200, 21000, 21500, OS 21000, CH 10400
• Observe and document nature in a systematic and integrative approach
• Pose and test hypothesis through applied learning laboratory setting
• Utilize recognized formats to communicate scientific observations in written and oral presentations

SI Social/Behavioral Scientific Inquiry^^ (3-4)
Completion of course focused on social or behavioral sciences, from:  ANS 20100, BA 26000, BA 26500, LS 20300, PY 10100, PY 20200, PY 21300, PY 21500, PY 22400, PY 23000, PY 23500, PY 24200, PY 26000, SS 20103, SUS 11000, SUS 21000
• Investigate how humans form and are formed by society
• Explore core concepts and analytic frameworks used to understand the dynamics of human behavior and societal formations
• Distinguish between qualitative and quantitative methods of human and social research

EE Social Responsibility (2)
Completion of LS 10200
• Explore fundamental questions about the nature of life and what makes it worth living
• Examine and compare major ethical theories in order to investigate the nature of moral judgments
• Evaluate one’s own personal ethical positions

EE Personal Responsibility (1-2)
Completion of 1-2 credit 10000-20000 level course focused on personal well being from OS, PE, BAM 20400, MAR 11000, MAR 24000, LS 20500
• Set goals
• Develop strategies for resilience
• Attend to personal wellness

[ ***For Associate-level degrees, CH requirements are satisfied by any CH category or course.]

[ ^^For Associate-level degrees, SI requirements are satisfied by any SI category or course.]

For some majors, certain of the Foundational Studies will satisfy requirements within the Major Studies as well.  Check degree programs for overlapping co-requirements.



Associate-Level Degrees - Overview


Core Competencies


APU’s undergraduate curriculum serves to develop Core Competencies across all degree programs:  Effective Communication [EC], Critical Thinking [CT], Cultural & Historical Perspective [CH], Scientific Inquiry [SI], and Ethical Engagement [EE].  Core Competencies are introduced through Foundational Studies and integrated through Major Studies.  At the associate level, students demonstrate Foundational-to-Integrated levels of learning outcomes.

Foundational Studies (24-28 credits)


  • EC Written Communication ** : WRIT 10100 (4)
  • EC Presentation & Media Literacy : from 10000-20000 level COMM or CH 10300 (3-4)
  • CT Critical Thinking : from 10000-20000 level CRIT (3-4)
  • CT Computation **  : MT 10100, BAM 10500, or higher placement (3-4)
  • CH Cultural & Historical Perspective : from 10000-20000 level CS, HI, HUM, LS 20100, LS 20200, LS 20400, RS (3-4)
  • SI Scientific Inquiry : from 10000-20000 level SC w/ lab, OS 21000 – or – ANS 20100, BA 26000, BA 26500, LS 20300, PY 10100, PY 20200, PY 21300, PY 21500, PY 22400, PY 23000, PY 23500, PY 24200, PY 26000, SS 20103, SUS 11000, SUS 21000  (3-4)
  • EE Social Responsibility : LS 10200 (2)
  • EE Personal Responsibility : from 10000-20000 OS/PE or BAM 20400, MAR 11000, MAR 24000, LS 20500 (1-2)

[ **  In order to demonstrate competency in the Foundational Studies of EC Written Communication and CT Computation, a minimum grade of ‘C’ (defined as C+, C, C-) must be earned in these required courses.]

Major Studies (20-32 credits)


  • Specialized Knowledge and Skills:  Each degree program is structured to develop specialized knowledge and skills through a set of Major Studies.  The Major Studies provide disciplinary focus as well as readiness for career and professional aspirations.
  • Integration of Core Competencies:  The Major Studies integrate and further develop the Core Competencies in relation to the field or discipline.  In some programs, the Major Studies also lead to Professional Competencies, addressing standards and/or certifications in a  particular field or profession.
  • Readiness:  The Major Studies at the associate-level develop readiness for further integrated competencies at the bachelor’s level.

Graduation Requirements


  • Minimum Requirement for Overall GPA:  For all undergraduate degree programs, the minimum overall GPA for graduation is 2.00.
  • Minimum GPA Requirement for Major Studies:  All programs have a minimum GPA requirement of 2.00 for Major Studies.  Some majors have higher minumum GPA requirements for Major Studies.  Check program descriptions for details.
  • Graduation Residency Requirement:  For an Associate-level degree, the final 16 credit hours must be taken at Alaska Pacific University. ‘Residency’ includes any courses offered by APU irrespective of delivery mode (campus, evening, eLearning).  Exceptions to the residency requirment are handled by Special Consideration appeals to the Registrar’s Advisory Committee.

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement: 64


 


Bachelor-Level Degrees - Overview


Core Competencies


APU’s curriculum serves to develop Core Competencies across all undergraduate degree programs:  Effective Communication [EC], Critical Thinking [CT], Cultural & Historical Perspective [CH], Scientific Inquiry [SI], and Ethical Engagement [EE].  The Core Competencies are introduced through Foundational Studies, integrated through Major Studies, and at the bachelor’s level, realized in the senior project.  At the bachelor’s level, students demonstrate Realized level learning outcomes.

Foundational Studies (32-40 credits)


  • EC Written Communication ** : WRIT 20100 (4)
  • EC Presentation & Media Literacy : from 10000-20000 level COMM or CH 10300 (3-4)
  • CT Critical Thinking : from 10000-20000 level CRIT (3-4)
  • CT Computation **  : MT 10100, BAM 10500, or higher placement (3-4)
  • CH Intellectual Traditions :  from 10000-20000 PH/HI, LS 20100, LS 20400 (4)
  • CH Creative Endeavors :  from 10000-20000 HUM, LS 20200, LS 20400 (4)
  • CH Intercultural & Spiritual Understandings : from 10000-20000 level RS/CS, LS 20400, OS 21400 section (3-4)
  • SI Biological/Physical Scientific Inquiry : from 10000-20000 level SC w/ lab, CH 10400, or OS 21000 (4)
  • SI Social/Behavioral Scientific Inquiry :ANS 20100, BA 26000, BA 26500, LS 20300, PY 10100, PY 20200, PY 21300, PY 21500, PY 22400, PY 23000, PY 23500, PY 24200, PY 26000, SS 20103, SUS 11000, SUS 21000  (3-4)
  • EE Social Responsibility : LS 10200 (2)
  • EE Personal Responsibility : from 10000-20000 OS/PE or BAM 20400, MAR 11000, MAR 24000, LS 20500 (1-2)

[ **  In order to demonstrate competency in the Foundational Studies of EC Written Communication and CT Computation, a minimum grade of ‘C’ (defined as C+, C, C-) must be earned in these required courses.]

Major Studies (50-84 credits)


  • Specialized Knowledge and Skills:  Each degree program is structured to develop specialized knowledge and skills through a set of Major Studies.  The Major Studies provide disciplinary focus as well as readiness for career and professional expectations. 
  • Integration of Core Compentencies:  The Major Studies integrate and further develop the Core Competencies in relation to the field or discipline, providing necessary attention to higher level aspects such as technical writing, quantitative reasoning, local and global perspective, research methods, and professional ethics.  In some programs, the Major Studies also lead to Professional Competencies, addressing professional standards and/or certifications in a particular field or profession. 
  • Practicum & Application: All bachelor-level degree programs incorporate Active Learning particularly through the expectation that students apply learning in real-world contexts by way of research, practicum, internship, and/or work experience.
  • Senior Project:  All bachelor-level degree programs culminate in the senior project, realizing proficiency in the Core Competencies and demonstrating the capacity to succeed in the discipline, field of study, or profession.

Self-Determined Studies (14 or more credits)


  • Each student is encouraged to identify a group of self-determined studies to distinguish the degree program, augment professional goals, or motivate life-long learning.  Students may choose to develop a minor, emphasis, concentration, or a set of electives that build skills in areas such as math, nonprofits, business, language study, digital content creation, or the arts, among others.

Graduation Requirements


  • Minimum Requirement for Overall GPA:  For all undergraduate degree programs, the minimum overall GPA for graduation is 2.00.
  • Minimum GPA Requirement for Major Studies:  All programs have a minimum GPA requirement of 2.00 for Major Studies.  Some majors have higher minumum GPA requirements for Major Studies.  Check program descriptions for details.
  • Graduation Residency Requirement:  For a bachelor-level degree, the final 32 credit hours must be taken ‘in residence’ at Alaska Pacific University. Residency includes any courses offered by APU irrespective of delivery mode (campus, evening, eLearning).  Exceptions to the residency requirment are handled by appeals to the Registrar’s Advisory Committee.
  • Upper Division Credit Hour Requirement:  A minimum of thirty (30) credit hours must consist of 30000 and 40000 level courses for the BA and BS degrees.

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement: 128